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The role of the cerebellum in the regulation of language functions
 
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1
Zakład Psychologii Lekarskiej Katedry Psychiatrii, UJ CM
 
2
Oddział Kliniczny Neurochirurgii i Neurotraumatologii Szpitala Uniwersyteckiego w Krakowie
 
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Oddział Neurochirurgii Dziecięcego Szpitala Uniwersyteckiego w Krakowie
 
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Katedra Psychiatrii UJ Collegium Medicum
 
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UJ Collegium Medicum
 
 
Submission date: 2016-09-28
 
 
Final revision date: 2017-01-12
 
 
Acceptance date: 2017-01-17
 
 
Online publication date: 2017-08-29
 
 
Publication date: 2017-08-29
 
 
Corresponding author
Anna Starowicz-Filip   

Zakład Psychologii Lekarskiej Katedra Psychiatrii , UJCM, Oddział Kliniczny Neurochirurgii i Neurotraumatologii Szpitala Uniwersyteckiego w Krakowie, Oddział Neurochirurgii Dziecięcego Szpitala Uniwersyteckiego w Krakowie, ul. Kopernika 21 a, 31-501 Kraków, Polska
 
 
Psychiatr Pol 2017;51(4):661–671
 
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ABSTRACT
The present paper is a review of studies on the role of the cerebellum in the regulation of language functions. This brain structure until recently associated chiefly with motor skills, visual-motor coordination and balance, proves to be significant also for cognitive functioning. With regard to language functions, studies show that the cerebellum determines verbal fluency (both semantic and formal) expressive and receptive grammar processing, the ability to identify and correct language mistakes, and writing skills. Cerebellar damage is a possible cause of aphasia or the cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS). Decreased cerebellocortical connectivity as well as anomalies in the structure of the cerebellum are emphasized in numerous developmental dyslexia theories. The cerebellum is characterized by linguistic lateralization. From the neuroanatomical perspective, its right hemisphere and dentate nucleus, having multiple cerebellocortical connections with the cerebral cortical language areas, are particularly important for language functions. Usually, language deficits developed as a result of a cerebellar damage have subclinical intensity and require applying sensitive neuropsychological diagnostic tools designed to assess higher verbal functions.
eISSN:2391-5854
ISSN:0033-2674